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In Progress List 2018

This list displays the most recent books nominated for Capitol Choices. You can filter by age group by selecting it from the drop-down box and clicking "select."
Matt
Lamothe
Chronicle
2017
This book shows readers a day in the life of seven children in seven different countries. While there are many interesting differences, the author illustrates the overall similarities the rhythm of their day. Readers will enjoy the detailed illustrations and meeting the actual kids each character is based on in the back of the book. -M. Crews
Laurel
Snyder
Emily
Hughes
Chronicle
20117
Understatement is the word for this series, full of warmth that comes through in the simplicity of the activities (building a fort, singing a good night song). When their grandfather comes to visit he notices that Charlie has grown bigger but Mouse is just "medium". The antics are true to the characters and universally child like and explanations aren't needed, either among the characters or to the readers. Three cheers for all three. Edie Ching (up to 7)
Casey
Beasley
Penguin (Dial/Random House)
2017
Blue Montgomery knows he is cursed, he can never win at anything, and that is why his "lucky" dad abandons him at the family homestead. Tumble Wilson is trying to escape her "history" and rescue Blue. Unlikely friends, the two discover inner strengths that change their fate and that of their families. A complex book worth the careful reading it demands. (10-14) Edie Ching
Cover of: Why Am I Me/
Paige
Britt
Sean
Qualls and Selina Alko
Scholastic Press
2017
As an African American father and son and a light-skinned mother and daughter approach the subway from different directions, the boy asks the titular question. As the children notice one another more—as well as the people participating in sporting and musical activities viewed through the train window—they each ponder related questions. Acrylic, colored pencil, and collage scenes containing many types on diversity invite these thoughts naturally. A clever visual climax brings the children together with intersecting faces at the edges, a trick portraying a common color in the overlap. Much food for conversation. Wendy Lukehart
Cover: This Beautiful Day
Richard
Jackson
Suzy
Lee
Other
2017
Nowhere in the book, does it say that the rain makes it “a beautiful day,” but that is what appears to be so when the oldest of three, bored siblings turns on the radio and a rain dance ensues. The black and white day, rendered in pencil and acrylics, is infused with a blue swirl of music that connects to the rain, pulling them all outside to puddle fun. Jackson’s jazzy verses scan with an occasional bump, but Lee’s scenes are ebullient. By the conclusion it is clear that there are various ways to have a "beautiful" day. Wendy Lukehart
Cover of: Town Is by the Sea
Joanne
Schwartz
Sydney
Smith
Groundwood
2017
Schwartz compares a boy’s daily activities in a shimmering seaside town with those of his father who mines coal underground. His evocative language and strategically repeated phrases combine with Smith’s ink and watercolor scenes to paint a powerful portrait of the life of a coal family and what the boy’s future will likely be. Smith’s strong black lines and shadows speak for themselves in this provocative story. Wendy Lukehart
Paul
Mosier
Harper
2017
On a train from California to Chicago, where she’ll live with an unknown relative, Rydr is struggling with loss, anger, and self-acceptance. She has survived the deaths of her drug-addicted mother and of her mean, chain-smoking grandmother. On the train ride Rydr transforms, and is transformed by, her fellow passengers, including a poet, a renegade Boy Scout, and a kind food vendor. Simple but powerful prose deliver wisdom and an unforgettable, heart-wrenching character. Lisa Cosgrove-Davies (10-14)
storm clouds, twister, and lightning
Simon
Winchester
Penguin (Viking)
2017
Hurricanes, typhoons, and tornadoes--disastrous weather explained by the author of When the Earth Shakes. Graceful writing and stunning photographs combine for an inviting introduction to superstorms.(10-14. K. Isaacs)
The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors
Drew
Daywalt
Adam
Rex
HarperCollins (Balzer + Bray)
2017
This humorous take on the classic game features an angsty rock, ferocious office supplies, and non-stop battles as Rock, Paper, and Scissors try to meet their warrior match. The text of the legend and the comic-style speech bubbles combine with Adam Rex's high-energy illustrations to create an exciting adventure for young readers. Meaghan McKeron. Seven to Ten.
Lauren
McLaaughlin
James Edward
Shippy
Recorded Books
2017
James Edward Shippy is adept at voicing not only male and female characters of varying races/cultures, but of also capturing their emotional states as they navigage "juvie", all charged with crimes, some heinous. The main narrator Isaac West has taken the "rap" for someone else in an effort to secure a better life for his sister but he finds lies in prison much more difficult to maintain. While the story may have a potentially happier resolution that is realistic, the friendships that form and the sense of what life is like for kids who really never have had a chance is very powerful. A compelling listen. Edie Ching (Audiobook).