Browse Books by Year

Current List In Progress

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In Progress List 2017

This list displays the most recent books nominated for Capitol Choices. You can filter by age group by selecting it from the drop-down box and clicking "select."
jane foster's colors
Jane
Foster
Other
2016

This title and First Words are the best board books I have seen this year. Simple. Colorful. Beautiful Design. Just what a board book should be. Publisher is little bee books, a division of Bonnier Publishing. -Ruth Anne Champion. Up to Seven.

jane foster's first words
Jane
Foster
Other
2016

This title and First Colors are the best board books I have seen this year. Simple. Colorful. Beautiful Design. Just what a board book should be. Publisher is little bee books, a division of Bonnier Publishing.-Ruth Anne Champion. Up to Seven.

Lucy Ruth
Cummins
Simon & Schuster (Atheneum)
3/15/2016

A lion is hanging out with a bunch of prey animals. One by one they begin to disappear. We all know what's happening - or do we? Surprise! Simple bright drawings and text pair together in this delightful picture book with an unexpected ending. Sure to delight children and parents alike. A perfect read aloud for one on one or with a small group. Up to Seven. - Alicia Blowers

Laura
Godwin
Rob
Dunlavey
Penguin (Schwartz & Wade/Random House)
2016

Minimal reverso text accompanies luminous mixed-media illustrations of a young owl's flight from home through the night sky, and back again. Sure to lull the youngest readers in their nests! Anonymous. Up to Seven

Brosgol cover Leave Me Alone
Vera
Brosgol
Macmillan (Roaring Brook)
2016

This tall tale is perfectly knit together from its classic beginning ("One there was an old woman. She lived in a small village in a small house...") to its satisfying ending about a job well done against enormous odds. Thirty grandchildren in need of sweaters and no peace in which to knit? Don't underestimate old women! Everything about this--story and art--is perfectly paced and hilarious. And not a stitch dropped. K. Meizner. Up to Seven.

School's First Day of School
Adam
Rex
Christian
Robinson
Macmillan (Neal Porter/Roaring Brook)
2016

The new school has been built. But he is so nervous! Is he ready to be full of teachers, and students, and learning? Anthropomorphizing the school to help ease the nervousness of kids, who might be attending a new school too, is a typically off-kilter Adam Rex moment. Christian Robinson's gentle and slightly old-fashioned illustrations are a perfect complement. Up to 7. Anonymous.

Curtis
Manley
Simon & Schuster (Paula Wiseman)
2016

Nick loves to read, and he loves his cats. It seems like a brilliant idea to teach the cats to read. At first Verne and Stevenson don't appreciate Nick's flashcards or nursery rhymes. Nick tries a different method, and Verne becomes quite interested, especially regarding books about fish. But, will Nick be able to convince Stevenson reading is fun? Up to Seven. Megan Crews

Cover image of The Flower Girl Wore Celery
Meryl G.
Gordon
Holly
Clifton-Brown
Kar-Ben
2016

Emma gets asked to be the flower girl at her cousin's wedding and the best part, she gets to wear a celery dress. Hilarity ensues as readers discover the many misconceptions that Emma has. Everything from a celery-colored dress to the ring-bearer being a boy rather than a bear. The child oriented illustrations brilliantly show Emma's misconceptions. The beauty of this picture book is not only that the wedding is a Jewish wedding (which we rarely see in picture books}, but the subtlety in which Emma learns that the wedding is between two girls. Up to Seven. Ruth Compton

Kim
Krans
Penguin (Wendy Lamb/Random House)
2016

A vocabulary enriching counting book imaginatively illustrated with realistically striking drawings. A companion book to the author's ABC Dream and just as enticing. Jackie Gropman

A bear in a tiled hallway through a door's security window
Sabine
Lipan
Manuela
Olten
Eerdmans
2016

In his 11th floor apartment, a boy announces to his mother that there is a bear in the door and then provides a long explanation of how it got there, what it wants, and when it will leave. This shaggy bear story is relayed in an extended conversation that would be perfect for two people to read aloud. Imaginative and funny, in words and pictures. (K.Isaacs. Up to Seven)